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Vintage Dilbert November 12, 2012

Vintage Dilbert
November 12, 2012

If I had my life to live over, I’d dare to make more mistakes next time.

I’d relax, I’d limber up.

I would be sillier than I’ve been this trip.

I would take fewer things seriously, take more chances, take more trips.

I’d climb more mountains, and swim more rivers.

I would eat more ice cream and less beans.

I would perhaps have more actual troubles, but I’d have fewer imaginary ones. You see, I’m one of those people who lived seriously, sanely, hour after hour, day after day. Oh, I’ve had my moments, and if I had it to do over again, I’d have more of them.

I’ve been one of those persons who never goes anywhere without a thermometer, a hot-water bottle, a raincoat, and a parachute.

If I had to do it again, I would travel lighter than this trip.

If I had my life to live over, I would start going barefoot earlier in the spring, and stay that way later in the fall.

I would go to more dances, I would ride more merry-go-rounds.

I would pick more daisies.

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Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
November 27, 1997

A blind boy sat on the steps of a building with a hat by his feet. He held up a sign which said: “I am blind, please help.”

There were only a few coins in the hat.

A man was walking by. He took a few coins from his pocket and dropped them into the hat. He then took the sign, turned it around, and wrote some words. He put the sign back so that everyone who walked by would see the new words.

Soon the hat began to fill up. A lot more people were giving money to the blind boy. That afternoon the man who had changed the sign came to see how things were.

The boy recognized his footsteps and asked, “Were you the one who changed my sign this morning? What did you write?”

The man said, “I only wrote the truth. I said what you said but in a different way.” I wrote: “Today is a beautiful day but I cannot see it.”

Both signs told people that the boy was blind. But the first sign simply said the boy was blind. The second sign told people that they were so lucky that they were not blind. Should we be surprised that the second sign was more effective?

Moral of the Story: Be thankful for what you have. Be creative. Be innovative. Think differently and positively. When life gives you a 100 reasons to cry, show life that you have 1000 reasons to smile. Face your past without regret. Handle your present with confidence. Prepare for the future without fear. Keep the faith and drop the fear.

The most beautiful thing is to see a person smiling. And even more beautiful, is knowing that you are the reason behind it!

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

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Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
November 25, 2005

I Am Thankful for…

The messes to clean after a party because it means friends have surrounded me.
The taxes I pay because it means that I’m employed.
The clothes that fit a little too snug because it means I have enough to eat.
My shadow who watches me work because it means I am out in the sunshine
A lawn that needs mowing, windows that need cleaning and gutters that need fixing because it means I have a home.
All the complaining I hear about our government because it means we have freedom of speech.
The spot I find at the far end of the parking lot because it means I am capable of walking
My huge heating bill because it means I am warm.
The lady behind me in church who sings off key, because it means that I can hear.
The piles of laundry and ironing because it means my loved ones are nearby
Weariness and aching muscles at the end of the day because it means I have been productive.
The alarm ringing in the early morning hours because it means that I’m awake and alive.

 

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Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
November 24, 2004

I have been in many places, but I’ve never been in Cahoots. Apparently, you can’t go alone. You have to be in Cahoots with someone.

I’ve also never been in Cognito. I hear no one recognizes you there.

I have, however, been in Sane. They don’t have an airport; you have to be driven there. I have made several trips there, thanks to my children, friends, family and work.

I would like to go to Conclusions, but you have to jump, and I’m not too much on physical activity anymore.

I have also been in Doubt. That is a sad place to go and I try not to visit there too often.

I’ve been in Flexible, but only when it was very important to stand firm.

Sometimes I’m in Capable, and I go there more often as I’m getting older.

One of my favorite places to be is in Suspense! It really gets the adrenaline flowing and pumps up the old heart! At my age I need all the stimuli I can get!

I may have been in Continent, but I don’t remember what country I was in. It’s an age thing. They tell me it is very wet and damp there.

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the circle of life

IMG_5213.JPG

When we were seventeen,
We carved our initials
on the inside of this bridge.

Desecrating public property,
Yes. I know.

Thirty some years later
we drove down that same road
to see if we could find the bridge,
the carved initials.

The bridge was there
spanning the little creek.
Newer initials had replaced ours.
IMG_5219.JPG
Older and wiser,
we no longer needed
to carve our initials
for posterity,
But were happy
with the remembering.

Last year they tore it down.
Carefully.
Every board numbered.
It took almost eight months,
but now it stands again.
Rebuilt. Repainted. Restored.
IMG_5220.JPG
Cox Farm Bridge. Built 1940. Rebuilt 2013.

I’m grateful for memories, for stories, and for those who care enough about covered bridges to make them historical landmarks.

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Essential Thinking

As well as the daily readings by Simon Guillebaud that I mentioned in my previous post, I’ve been reading through Pauls first letter to the church in Thessalonica this week. There’s lots in there about hope- he uses the word ‘encourage’ about 10 times (I haven’t counted, its a guesstimate) in quite a short letter, and also lots of ‘giving thanks for…’- Paul is both encouraged by them, and also wants to encourage them. But what for?

The reading I had this morning, which linked to Psalm 121 (I lift my eyes up to the hills, where does my hope come from? My hope comes from you Lord…) helped me to focus my thoughts on what we’re about, what Paul was saying to the church in northern Macedonia- Hope. Keep hoping. Don’t give up hoping. Look higher than your current difficulties and hope.

This week I’ve been organising a number…

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Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
November 21, 1991

One of the first steps to accomplishing great things in your life is to cease dwelling on the negative things in your past. Carefully assess your present strengths, successes, and achievements. Dwell on those positive events in your life, and quit limiting your potential by constantly thinking about what you have done poorly. Alice and the Mad Hatter in Wonderland had a conversation that illustrates this concept:

Alice: Where I come from, people study what they are not good at in order to be able to do what they are good at.

Mad Hatter: We only go around in circles in Wonderland, but we always end up where we started. Would you mind explaining yourself?

Alice: Well, grown-ups tell us to find out what we did wrong, and never do it again

Mad Hatter: That’s odd! It seems to me that in order to find out about something, you have to study it. And when you study it, you should become better at it. Why should you want to become better at something and then never do it again? But please continue.

Alice: Nobody ever tells us to study the right things we do. We’re only supposed to learn from the wrong things. But we are permitted to study the right things other people do. And sometimes we’re even told to copy them.

Mad Hatter: That’s cheating!

Alice: You’re quite right, Mr. Hatter. I do live in a topsy-turvy world. It seems like I have to do something wrong first, in order to learn from what not to do. And then, by not doing what I’m not supposed to do, perhaps I’ll be right. But I’d rather be right the first time, wouldn’t you?

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