Archive

Tag Archives: Father

Vintage Dilbert March 11, 2011

Vintage Dilbert
March 11, 2011

A son took his old father to a restaurant for an evening dinner.  Father being very old and weak, while eating, dropped food on his shirt and trousers.  Other diners watched him in disgust while his son was calm.

After he finished eating, his son who was not at all embarrassed, quietly took him to the wash room, wiped the food particles, removed the stains, combed his hair and fitted his spectacles firmly.  When they came out, the entire restaurant was watching them in dead silence, not able to grasp how someone could embarrass themselves publicly like that.  The son settled the bill and started walking out with his father.

At that time, an old man amongst the diners called out to the son and asked him, “Don’t you think you have left something behind?”.

The son replied, “No sir, I haven’t”.

The old man retorted, “Yes, you have!  You left a lesson for every son and hope for every father”.

The restaurant went silent.

I hope you enjoyed this story about Dad's as much as I have..... 
Explore the MS&D archives for over 1000 additional stories... 
Take Care and God Bless :-) Kenny T
Author: Amir A Kader
Morning Sry and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
December 14, 1993

If you are anything like me, you have had the privilege of growing up with the world’s best dad. There is nothing quite like the love of a father, and there aren’t enough words to describe it. Let’s face it, ladies; we need our daddies, and here is why.

1. They treat us like the princesses we are. Our dads know exactly how our significant other should be treating us, and if that isn’t happening, Daddy becomes the knight in shining armor. After all, he is the first man we ever love and the first to love us back.

2. It does not matter if you run out of gas in the middle of nowhere or need someone to carry you out of the haunted house; Dad is the ultimate definition of protection. We all remember the nightmares and immediately running down the hall just the climb in bed beside your dad. There is comfort and the feeling of finally being safe when you are with him.

3. We need someone that is brutally honest, someone that is not afraid of telling us we need to wear less makeup (because he knows we are naturally beautiful), or never go on a date with that guy again (because he’ll just show up on your secret date with him and ruin it anyway).

4. Every girl needs to know she is worth so much more than she believes. You get that every single day when your dad is around. It’s almost like they are trained, or it’s inherited, to constantly remind us we deserve better, we are capable of anything, and we can make our own decisions.

5. It is hard not to become a well-rounded individual when you have someone teaching you independence, the rules of every sport, and how to be a leader. Having the world’s best dad is like taking a life core class in college. He teaches you everything you need to know.

6. When your dreams seem out of reach, who is the one that believes in them the most? Probably the one that has taught you to dream that big. Dads push you to be the best you can be and achieve what seems impossible. When your plan fails miserably, he will be ready to pick up your pieces and build you up again.

7. Need more groceries? Got it. Need more gas in the car? Got it. Need (another) formal dress? Got it. You get the picture.

8. You need someone that will fight for you (figuratively and literally), even when you are wrong. The minute you walk through the doors with tears running down your face, Dad is already cracking his knuckles.

9. Just when you think it could never happen to you — it does. You have a flat tire and, thankfully, you know exactly what to do all because he sat you down one Saturday afternoon, and just when he thought you were only scrolling through Instagram, you were actually paying attention. Good thing.

10. You need your Daddy because imagine a world without them. Imagine if you did not have that strong shoulder to cry on. Imagine if you did not have someone to rebuild your confidence when it gets knocked down. Imagine if you did not have someone to always call you their little girl.

By -Lindsey Rae Hurst
Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
February 17, 2015

In 1900, fathers prayed their children would learn English.
Today, fathers pray their children will speak English.

In 1900, if a father put a roof over his family’s head, he was a success.
Today, it takes a roof, deck, pool, and 4-car garage. And that’s just the vacation home.

In 1900, a father waited for the doctor to tell him when the baby arrived.
Today, a father must wear a smock, know how to breathe, and make sure a new tape is in the video camera.

In 1900, fathers passed on clothing to their sons.
Today, kids wouldn’t touch Dad’s clothes if they were sliding naked down an icicle.

In 1900, fathers could count on children to join the family business.
Today, fathers pray their kids will soon come home from college long enough to teach them how to work the computer and set the VCR.

In 1900, fathers shook their children gently and whispered, “Wake up, it’s time for school.”
Today, kids shake their fathers violently at 4 a.m., shouting: “Wake up, it’s time for hockey practice!”

In 1900, a father gave a pencil box for Christmas, and the child was all smiles.
Today, a father spends $800 at Toys ‘R’ Us, and the kid says, “But I wanted an X-box!”

In 1900, a father came home from work to find his wife and children at the supper table.
Today, a father comes home to a note: “Jimmy’s at baseball, Cindy’s at gymnastics, I’m at gym, Pizza in the fridge.”

 --  By  John J. Plomp
Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
May 14, 2002

A little boy was helping his father move some books out of an attic into more spacious quarters downstairs. It was important to this little boy that he was helping his dad, even though he was probably getting in the way and slowing things down more than he was actually assisting. But that boy had a wise and patient father who knew it was more important to work at a task with his young son than it was to move a pile of books efficiently.

Among this man’s books, however, were some rather large study books, and it was a chore for the boy to get them down the stairs. As a matter of fact, on one particular load, the boy dropped his pile of books several times. Finally, he sat down on the stairs and wept in frustration. He wasn’t doing any good at all. He wasn’t strong enough to carry the big books down a narrow stairway. It hurt him to think he couldn’t do this for his daddy.

Without a word, the father picked up the dropped load of books, put them into the boy’s arms, and scooped up both the boy and the books into his arms and carried them down the stairs. And so they continued load after load, both very much enjoying each other’s company. The boy carrying the books, and the dad carrying the boy.

 

Author Unknown - Please comment if you know the author
 so credit can be given
Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
April 6, 2002

Kleenex Alert

I thought I might die. It was the first semester of my second year in college and my freshman-year boyfriend had just broken up with me. I didn’t know what to do. I had not been without a steady boyfriend since my sophomore year in high school and this one was special. I had seen it as my first legitimate adult relationship being that I was almost twenty. I was miserable, unable to eat or sleep. My room mates were worried, but had given up after trying to cheer me a thousand different ways. I had even written my estranged sweetheart a poem about an old doll that had been left on the shelf. Me. I was so hurt and so young.

I began to call home almost every day after the break-up to muster sympathy from my Mom. My Dad and I however, continued to have those bare bones Dad-and-Daughter phone conversations during our official Sunday phone call – the ones where I reassured him each time that I was studying and had enough money. My Mom and I on the other hand really talked. She wanted to know everything that was happening around campus, what I was learning in my classes and what was good in the cafeteria. These were the days before cell phone “anytime minutes” and unlimited long distance so we began racking up some bills. I waited for the “other fish in the sea” speech that thankfully never came. My Mother was supportive and patient through my tears but after weeks had gone by she finally told me that I was being silly continuing to pine. I knew she was right so I tried to mend my broken heart by burying myself in my studies even more than before and joining a few more college organizations. Dad stayed away from the topic altogether.  I knew that he felt bad that I felt bad but, he generally left emotional rescue to my mother.

One day when I returned to my dorm room from an afternoon class, I found my room mate sitting at her desk grinning up at me. An arrangement of pretty pale flowers sat on the table in the middle of the room.

“For you” she said. My heart stopped. This was it. My ex had finally realized the error of his ways and wanted me back. He hadn’t actually fallen for that Barbie doll freshman in his RA orientation group after all. I approached slowly and lifted the fragrant basket opening the little card with shaky hands. Written there was simply: From the only man who has loved you for twenty years. My eyes filled with tears. My room mate looked at me with confusion.

“These are from my Dad” I choked sitting down to cradle the bouquet in my hands and gaze at the delicate blooms.

“Your Dad? What for?” My room mate crossed the room and sat down next to me, arm around my shoulders. I handed her the card. She smiled again.

“Your Dad’s so sweet.”

“I know” I sniffed. Right there something shifted in me. I gained perspective. My Mom’s steady counsel had aided in my slow recovery but this was the shot that I needed to heal completely.

Many years have passed since then and I am happily married with a daughter of my own. My father has had his own battles to face in recent years with failing health and forced retirement, but the grand image of Dad as protector never really goes away. As it turns out a father’s physical strength is just a metaphor for what he really gives his children. I don’t think I realized the absolute fortress of my Dad’s character, the strength of his morals and convictions until he began to fail physically. Mom had been telling me over and over again how my father never complained about the deterioration of his quality of life no matter how bad he felt but that he often lamented no longer being able to do things with and for us. I wanted a way to reassure him that not being as active anymore had nothing to do with his ability to be a great father. We had traveled together all our lives Dad and I and I did miss that aspect of our relationship. But the foundation and support that he had given me had never weakened. In fact it had strengthened.

I had all but forgotten about the boy friend, my desperation, and Dad’s flowers until I saw a picture in an old album that jogged my memory. My eyes filled with tears again at my father’s sweet gesture. It was just a week before Father’s Day and I had an idea.

My Dad opened his simple card with a weak smile as smiles come harder with Parkinson’s. The flowers had surprised him although he had always been the rare man who appreciated flowers as a gift. The card read: From the only woman who has loved you since the day she was born.

Then I hugged him asking him in a whisper “Do you remember?”

“I remember” he assured me softly. We nodded at each other. As always there was no need for words.

By Heidi Durig Heiby – from “Sweet Little Treasures”

dilbert

— By Bill McCartney

We jog, run, camp, fish, and build furniture. But, do we ever cross the line?

I’m Bill McCartney… It’s 4th and Goal!

I know men who can take raw wood and a few nails and create a family heirloom. And then there are those of us who can listen to a sputtering engine and pinpoint the problem without even popping the hood. Other guys fly fish or fry up a gourmet meal.

Some of us are music lovers, avid readers and huge pet fans. These interests help fulfill us, but sometimes we can get caught up filling our days… and evenings… and weekends… pursuing activities that leave our families in the dust.

Take our interest in man’s best friend. Our animals are companions for kids, protection for the home and just plain furry fun for the whole family. But, with all the extras and supplies available, there can be a tendency to get a little carried away.

We’ve got doggy beds, doggy diet chow, and special canine clothing. People primp their pooches, put them up in pet hotels, and even take them to counselors, when they’re not sure what’s dogging Fido. Things can easily get out of hand.

While we enjoy our outside interests and hobbies, do we let these “extras” become sore spots in our lives? Do they absorb far more time, energy and money than we should be sacrificing?

Any diversion can draw us away from the relationships that make life worth living. Let’s ask ourselves what’s more important, fulfilling our own needs or being a father to our children? What will they remember longer? The shiny wax job on the classic ‘vette? Or, all those times we got on the ground and wrestled around with them?

Guys, we can take our hobbies to the extreme, pouring money and time into efforts that have no lasting value. Anything we put ahead of our wives and children, whether a pedigreed pooch, a workbench full of tools, or a super-deluxe convertible, says something about who we are, as men. Let’s keep first things first and stay clear of anything that pulls us away from our first priorities as fathers and husbands.

~~~~~~~~~

“…Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is admirable, if anything is excellent or praiseworthy, think about such things.” — Philippians 4:8

~~~~~~~~~

Former head football coach of the University of Colorado, Coach Bill McCartney is the founder and former president of Promise Keepers. Currently he is the founder and chairman of The Road to Jerusalem ministry.

During his time as a football coach he led the University of Colorado to a share of the national championship in 1990. In 1996, he was inducted into the Orange Bowl Hall of Fame and in 1999 he was inducted into the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame. He was honored as the Big Eight Conference Coach of the Year in 1985, 1989, and 1990 and also won National Coach of the Year Honors in 1989.

%d bloggers like this: