Dress Me In Red

Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
June 3, 20013

Kleenex Alert

In my dual profession as an educator and a health care provider, I have worked with numerous children infected with the virus, which causes AIDS. The relationships that I have had with these special kids have been gifts in my life. They have taught me so many things, but I especially learned that great courage can be found in the smallest of packages. Let me tell you about Tyler.

Tyler was born with HIV; his mother was also infected. From the very beginning of his life, he was dependent on medications to enable him to survive. When he was 5, he had a tube surgically inserted into a vein in his chest. This tube was connected to a pump, which he carried in a small backpack on his back. Medications were hooked up to this pump and were continuously supplied through this tube to his bloodstream. At times, he also needed supplemental oxygen to support his breathing.

Tyler wasn’t willing to give up one single moment of his childhood to this deadly disease. It was not unusual to find him playing and racing around his backyard, wearing his medicine-laden backpack and dragging his tank of oxygen behind him in his little wagon. All of us who knew Tyler, marveled at his pure joy at being alive and the energy it gave him.

Tyler’s mom often teased him by telling him he moved so fast she needed to dress him in red. That way, when she peered out the window to check on him playing in the yard, she could quickly spot him.

This dreaded disease eventually wore down even the likes of a little dynamo, like Tyler. He grew quite ill and, unfortunately, so did his HIV- infected mother. When it became apparent that he wasn’t going to survive, Tyler’s mom talked to him about death. She comforted him by telling Tyler that she was dying, too, and that she would be with him soon in Heaven.

A few days before his death, Tyler beckoned me over to his hospital bed and whispered, “I might die soon. I’m not scared. When I die, please dress me in red. Mom promised she’s coming to Heaven, too. I’ll be playing when she gets there, and I want to make sure she can find me!!!

 

By Cindy Dee Holms
Advertisements
23 comments
  1. I have needed significant amounts of kleenex this past year myself; another reminder to me – be thankful for my blessings. No matter how ill you are, someone is worse off. I did indeed cry. Blessings on your work and to you; also to those whose lives you touch.

  2. inspireddaybyday said:

    Reblogged this on Inspired day by day and commented:
    What a beautiful story of a very remarkable brave little boy.

  3. Lyn said:

    Thank you for the Kleenex warning. It was certainly needed.

  4. Reblogged this on The Blurred Line and commented:
    When I die dress me in red so you can find me heaven. Please read this beautiful story from https://morningstoryanddilbert.wordpress.com/2013/06/03/dress-me-in-red/

    In my dual profession as an educator and a health care provider, I have worked with numerous children infected with the virus, which causes AIDS. The relationships that I have had with these special kids have been gifts in my life. They have taught me so many things, but I especially learned that great courage can be found in the smallest of packages. Let me tell you about Tyler.

    Tyler was born with HIV; his mother was also infected. From the very beginning of his life, he was dependent on medications to enable him to survive. When he was 5, he had a tube surgically inserted into a vein in his chest. This tube was connected to a pump, which he carried in a small backpack on his back. Medications were hooked up to this pump and were continuously supplied through this tube to his bloodstream. At times, he also needed supplemental oxygen to support his breathing.

    Tyler wasn’t willing to give up one single moment of his childhood to this deadly disease. It was not unusual to find him playing and racing around his backyard, wearing his medicine-laden backpack and dragging his tank of oxygen behind him in his little wagon. All of us who knew Tyler, marveled at his pure joy at being alive and the energy it gave him.

    Tyler’s mom often teased him by telling him he moved so fast she needed to dress him in red. That way, when she peered out the window to check on him playing in the yard, she could quickly spot him.

    This dreaded disease eventually wore down even the likes of a little dynamo, like Tyler. He grew quite ill and, unfortunately, so did his HIV- infected mother. When it became apparent that he wasn’t going to survive, Tyler’s mom talked to him about death. She comforted him by telling Tyler that she was dying, too, and that she would be with him soon in Heaven.

    A few days before his death, Tyler beckoned me over to his hospital bed and whispered, “I might die soon. I’m not scared. When I die, please dress me in red. Mom promised she’s coming to Heaven, too. I’ll be playing when she gets there, and I want to make sure she can find me!!!

    By Cindy Dee Holms

  5. I had the privilege of meeting a 8 year old boy named Prince in an AIDS home. He was a brave warrior and with his last gasps of breath tried to sing “What a friend we have in Jesus”. We have so many lessons to learn from these little ones. Beautiful post. Thank you.

  6. To such as these belongs the kingdom of heaven (Mt 19:14).

  7. Thanks for the Kleenex” warning. You seem to have a way of getting my week started with a jolt! Thanks, Kenny T! This story reminds me that I don’t have a problem in the world. God bless! 🙂 Dave

  8. mtetar said:

    What a story showing all the right reasons why one should be grateful, humble, appreciative, content, and enjoy each day’s Blessings because you don’t know what tomorrow will bring. Be Blessed, Mtetar

  9. Your posts are so encouraging. They are moments I know I can come to for “real stuff.” Thank you for your work and faithfulness!

  10. What a precious story of a child with passion for life and the wonderful hope that lies past our familiar blue planet.

  11. The story is inspirational to be sure. What amused me was “Dilbert” in that it speaks of a pager. Children born in the last ten or twelve years will never know the aggravation of having a beeper. I turned down a supervisory job once because it required wearing a beeper. When I leave work, I want to leave work. Well, as a shift supervisor, they still seemed to find me to call me in early though.

  12. Out of the mouths of Babes… I love this. It is so sweet. Children are precious. Seeing through their eyes and not ours 🙂 . Take care!

  13. prayingforoneday said:

    WOW..

    Man or not here, tears flow…
    Sad but not at the same time..
    No Sad…Sad story…

    But in the end there were smiles..

    x

  14. Kids are amazing. Humble yourself as this little child for these are the greatest in the kingdom!

  15. asd539 said:

    Ok, sure teared up after that awesome post. Wow!!!

  16. This is fantastic – such courage from a young age. From the mouths of babes, indeed ….

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: